U.S. Army Medical Dept, Fort Bennning Medical Activity
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Patient and Family Centered Care


The Patient and Family Centered Care (PFCC) concept embraced at Martin Army Community Hospital has shown that the active participation of patients and families in health care planning and decision-making is essential to quality, safety, and achieving the best outcomes. It is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, families, and health care staff.

Supporting this philosophy is the belief that:

  • Patients want and need supportive relationships, to be valued and respected, and have a sense of control over their lives.


  • How care is delivered is as important as the care itself.

  • Creating an environment that is better for the patient is also better for the Staff.

  • A hospital cannot live up to its potential without fully engaged professional staff, who in the end, can drive the commitment, passion and performance of the organization.



Our focus is based on the following four principles:

  • People are treated with dignity and respect.


  • We communicate and share complete and unbiased information thatís useful.

  • Individuals and families participate with enhanced control and independence.

  • We collaborate with patients and their families in developing plans for healthcare delivery, policies, educational programs, and environmental improvements.




Patient and Family Advocate Office

The Patient and Family Advocate Office staff members serve as liaisons between patients, their families, and staff. We accept compliments, suggestions, inquiries, and concerns from patients and family members. Our goal is to help your visit as a patient go as smoothly as possible. If you are not receiving the medical care you feel you require, please speak to the clinic/ward Administrator, NCOIC or OIC for an explanation. If an explanation is not offered or what is offered is unsatisfactory to you, please contact the Patient and Family Advocate Office. If your questions cannot be answered immediately, all the facts will be recorded and researched. A response will be provided to you by telephone, letter, or in person. This action will in no way compromise or diminish your medical care.


Location: First floor of the hospital (Bldg 9200) in Room 103 and 103A or Consolidated Troop Medical Clinic (Bldg 2515).


Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Phone: (706) 544-1817 or 544-2788 (a 24-hour recorder is available after duty hours);CTMC (706) 544-3940.


E-mail: Click here to send an e-mail to a Patient and Family Advocate.





Advance Medical Directives


WHAT IS AN ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

An Advance Medical Directive is a written statement of your wishes regarding your healthcare, which goes into effect if at some time you are unable to make healthcare decisions. There are two (2) types of directives: a Living Will and a Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare.



WHAT IS A LIVING WILL?

A Living Will is a document which states your desires concerning the medical treatment you do, or do not receive if you become unable to make your own medical decisions.



WHAT IS A DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY FOR HEALTHCARE?

A Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare is a document in which you give another adult person the legal authority to make medical treatment decisions for you if you become unable to do so. You can designate anyone, a spouse, relative, or good friend as your decision-maker.



WHY SHOULD I PUT MY WISHES IN WRITING?

If, as a result of serious injury or illness, you become unable to make medical treatment decisions, you retain legal ability to control your medical treatment by having an Advance Medical Directive. Putting your wishes in writing helps your doctor, family, and friends know what medical treatment you do, or do not want in case you cannot tell them yourself.



WHO SHOULD I TELL ABOUT MY ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

Before you prepare an Advance Medical Directive, you should discuss your medical treatment wishes with your physicians, close family members, and the person you choose as your surrogate. Because patients see different physicians, a copy should be placed in your outpatient medical record. You should also bring a copy of your Advance Medical Directive with you anytime you are admitted to the hospital. A copy should be placed in your inpatient medical record. A copy of your Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare should also be given to the person you named as your surrogate decision-maker.



WHO SHOULD I TELL ABOUT MY ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

Before you prepare an Advance Medical Directive, you should discuss your medical treatment wishes with your physicians, close family members, and the person you choose as your surrogate. Because patients see different physicians, a copy should be placed in your outpatient medical record. You should also bring a copy of your Advance Medical Directive with you anytime you are admitted to the hospital. A copy should be placed in your inpatient medical record. A copy of your Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare should also be given to the person you named as your surrogate decision-maker.



AM I REQUIRED TO HAVE AN ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

No, you are not required by law or Army Regulation or hospital policy to have an Advance Medical Directive in order to receive care. However, an Advance Medical Directive is the most effective way to ensure desires concerning medical treatment are honored if you become unable to communicate your choices to those providing your medical care.



WHAT SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN AN ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

You should declare your desires concerning the initiation or withdrawal of life-sustaining medical treatment. Typical instructions include those concerning:

  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): Treatment to restore breathing and heartbeat. It may include pushing on the chest, electric shock to the chest, and the insertion of a breathing tube in your throat.

  • Dialysis: Treatment to clean the blood with a machine when the kidneys do not function.

  • Being placed on a ventilator or breathing machine.

  • Giving food, water, and medication through tubes.

  • Pain Management.

  • Donating your organs.



WHAT IF MY DOCTOR AND I DO NOT AGREE ABOUT MY TREATMENT?

Your doctor will treat you according to professionally accepted medical standards. If you and your doctor do not agree about your medical treatment, you have the right to request to be treated by another doctor. You may also seek advice from the MACH Ethics Committee by contacting the Chaplain or the Patient and Family Advocate Office.



CAN I CHANGE MY ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE?

Your Advance Medical Directive can be changed, or revoked by you at any time, either verbally or in writing. If you do so, it is crucial that you tell your physician and family members, along with anyone you have designated as your decision-maker.



HOW CAN I HAVE AN ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE PREPARED?

It is highly recommended that you discuss Advance Medical Directives with your family and physician before you prepare one. A Patient and Family Advocate can provide you contact information to the Fort Benning Legal Office for document preparation.



WHAT DO I NEED TO REMEMBER?

It is important to remember that you are a member of your own healthcare team. Your wishes about your care are important to your doctor and the other healthcare professionals. They can serve you best if you continue to talk with them and with your family throughout your treatment, both in and out of the hospital.



IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
  • Hospital Information

    (706)544-2041/2042

  • Patient and Family Advocate Office

    (706) 544-1817/2788/3940

  • Hospital Chaplainís Office

    (706) 544-3864

  • AOD (after Normal Duty Hours)

    (706)544-2041/2042

The proponent agency of this pamphlet is the Patient and Family Advocate Office. Users are invited to send suggestions and comments on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publication and Blank Forms) to Commander, Martin Army Community Hospital, ATTN: Patient and Family Advocate Office, Fort Benning, GA 31905-5637 PATIENT RIGHTS





Patient Rights and Responsibilities


Patient Rights

Our dedicated staff will work hard to ensure your earliest possible recovery. As a patient, you (or your designated representative) have the right to:

Be provided with considerate, high quality, respectful care.

Participate in decisions concerning your care or to designate someone who can speak for you.

Know the names of your health care providers.

Have your personal information kept confidential and privacy respected.

Obtain a second opinion concerning your diagnosis.

Participate in any discussion concerning your care and to receive information concerning advance directives.

Receive advance notice, be informed about research projects and know you can refuse to participate in them.

Be informed of facility rules and regulations.

Have a fair and efficient process for resolving differences with your health care providers and the institution that serves you.

Achieve optimum pain relief as an important part of your treatment.



Patient Responsibilities

In order to provide you with quality health care, it is essential that there be close cooperation and clear communication between you and the hospital staff. You can be of great assistance by assuming the following responsibilities:

Provide the staff with all the information you can on your medical history, conditions, and use of medications.

Ask questions when you do not understand your treatment plan.

Participate in your treatment plan.

Follow the hospital's policies regarding patient care and conduct, and be considerate of the rights of other patients and the staff.

Keep appointments or cancel them ahead of the scheduled time.

Report any violations of your rights to the head nurse or designee, or the Patient and Family Advocate Office (PFAO).

Promptly return your medical records to the control of the hospital.

Communicate the presence, quality and intensity of pain to the staff.



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